USS Allen M. Sumner DD-692

Commanding Officer
  "The Captain"

   

1944-1945

Norman John Sampson, CDR, USN

Commander Norman John SAMPSON, Sumner's first Commanding Officer, was born 14 October 1909 and died 18 June 1983. He graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in June, 1932 and retired as a Captain on 18 April 1960. Captain SAMPSON served as Commanding Officer of the USS Virgo (AKA-20) from July 1951 until September 1952. His assignments prior to the Sumner included the USS Cummings (DD-365), USS Brazos (AO-4) and USS Osmond Ingram (DD-255) on which he was the XO. He earned two Silver Stars during WWII, one of which was for the Battle of Ormoc Bay.  His brother, R. Roy Sampson, commanded another Sumner Class destroyer,  the USS J. William Ditter (DD-751/DM-31). Captain SAMPSON assumed command of the Sumner on January 26, 1944 at Brooklyn Navy Yard and was relieved by Captain HOWARD on September 19, 1945 while the ship was at anchor in Tokyo Bay.

The following is his biography from the U.S. Naval Academy's 1932 Lucky Bag:

            NORMAN JOHN SAMPSON "Delilah" "Sam" "Sammy" New Haven, Connecticut. "Delilah" spent eighteen years in New Haven weighing the pros and cons of a life at sea against that of an opulent plutocrat, and then, realizing the curse of riches, wisely chose the course to Crabtown. He soon made known a select repertoire of shower-bath opera and a propensity for making friends. "Sam" is neither to be classed as a snake nor as a Red Mike; he seems to maintain a happy medium, though undeniably susceptible to feminine wiles. The combined efforts of some seven or eight academic departments deny him the right of being a savoir; math, caught him in a weak moment lasting three months during his youngster year and nearly succeeded in shanghaiing him to the cold outside, but an eleventh hour rally, prognosticating happily for the future, saved him to the Navy. The service will gain by his admission to the roster. His amiable disposition will make him well liked wherever he is on duty, and the harder the sledding the better he likes it.

1945-1947

 

John William Howard, CDR, USN

Commander John William HOWARD was born in Hillsboro, Texas in 1912 and was a graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy in 1934.  He served in the Navy for 30 years retiring as a Captain. He passed away November 13, 1997 in Norfolk, Virginia at age 85 from complications of pneumonia. He is interred in Hampton National Cemetery. His assignments prior to the Sumner included the USS Richmond (CL-9) and the USS Rathburne (DD-113). Commander HOWARD assumed command of the Sumner September 19, 1945 while the ship was at anchor in Tokyo Bay. He was relieved by Captain EDRINGTON January 17, 1947 at Bremerton, Washington.  Thanks to Bill Gonyo for sending in the photo of Captain Howard from the USNA 1934 Lucky Bag.

The following is his biography from the U.S. Naval Academy's 1934 Lucky Bag:

            JOHN WILLIAM HOWARD "Jack" "Kollo" "Pete" HILLSBORO, Texas. PETE hails from the plains of Texas, and would have come to the Naval Academy astride a wild-eyed pinto pony, only his legs weren't long enough to ride one. Anyhow he came, and because he was well equipped mentally and physically. Uncle Sam hired another sailor. Since then he has taken life with his usual calm disposition , remaining serenely indifferent to work. In the way of athletics, he likes soccer and baseball, but an excess of monkey instinct (or something) has led him to favor the gym team, and he has developed real ability in that line. While naturally savvy, "Cosmo," other heavy literature, and a good mattress (he claims he combed B. H. for it Plebe Year) agree with him quite a lot, but he can still give any star man a good battle. Pete holds his own at all the hops — also wears the oldest pair of shoes in active service in the regiment. He receives lots of letters, writes less, and judging from ravings about campaigns on leave, and first hand experience at listening, we think he must slay them quite easily. Jack makes the ideal wife, always disagreeing, either for the sake of argument or for downright orneriness. However, his genuine laugh and ready story win him an entrance to any "session." His easily made friendships will always last. In the meanwhile, he spends a good deal of time on his bunk blandly awaiting the moment when he can throw his cap (with an egg in it into the air and give three cheers for the many friends he leaves behind him.

1947-1948

Thomas Craighead Edrington, III, CDR, USN

Commander Thomas Craighead EDRINGTON, III was born in Philadelphia, Pa and graduated from Annapolis in 1934. His first duties were aboard a battleship. He transferred to destroyer duty in the Far East from 1935 to 1941. While in the Far East he met and married Josephine Hoffman who resided in the Philippines, her father managed a US oil company (Tidewater) in Asia. Jo’s parents were interned in Santo Thomas during WWII, with only her mother surviving and being liberated. Captain EDRINGTON served on the battleship New York (BB-34) as Gunnery Officer during WWII. Following other assignments on heavy cruisers including the USS Parrott (DD-218) and command (1947-48) of the destroyer USS ALLEN M. SUMNER (DD-692). In the Far East he was decorated for performance in combat in support of the Korean operations while Chief Staff Officer, Amphibious Transport Division 11. In 1955 he obtained his Ph.D. in Psychology from Tulane followed by a billet in Washington, DC. Retirement from the Navy due to service related disabilities followed and Captain EDRINGTON went to the Rand Corporation in Santa Monica. He left Rand to be part of the creation of the Systems Development Corporation which did very advanced defense projects. Two children survive him and Jo. Captain EDRINGTON’s families (brothers, father, and nephews) were all at one time active in the Navy. He was Thomas C. EDRINGTON III and today there is a grandson, Thomas C. EDRINGTON V. Many thanks to Captain EDRINGTON's son Tom for sending us this photograph. We also present a more relaxed photo of the Captain taken during the 1947 WestPac cruise thanks to Arne Schumacher. You may learn more about Captain EDRINGTON at http://www.edrington.com. Captain EDRINGTON assumed command of the Sumner January 17, 1947 in Bremerton, Washington and was relieved by Captain MAYBERRY June 12, 1948 in San Diego.

The following is his biography from the U.S. Naval Academy's 1934 Lucky Bag:

            THOMAS CRAIGHEAD EDRINGTON, III "Tom" "Eli". At Large A NAVY Junior fresh from Mare Island. Tommy arrived in the summer of ' 30, and has since proceeded to show us of what stuff he is made. On almost any early morning, " Say, have you heard the one about ... " His humor has helped us over the gripes of Full Dress Parades with five minutes to get into uniform. Tom ' s a versatile chap. Having decided one day during Plebe Year that he would like to become a cartoonist, he picked up a pencil and went at it; a week later he sent in his first drawing to the Log. Not satisfied with having become an artist, he next picked up a rattling typewriter and turned out a surprising number of good short stories. Then, feeling an urge to get out in the open, he hunted up a forgotten tennis racquet and landed on the courts with both feet to defeat all comers. His one big aversion is the fair sex. Tom is a red, white and blue Red Mike. But this dislike of dragging has stood him in such good stead with Johnny Gow, Juice, Nav, and the rest that he has but seldom found himself in prominence upon the weekly bush. Tom has always been an enthusiastic chap, full of good fellowship and fun. His originality and ready wit have made him a host of friends wherever he has gone. His Irish sense of humor, his originality, and his general ability will carry him a long way. Good luck to you, Tom!

1948-1949

Dale Mayberry, CDR, USN

Commander MAYBERRY, a graduate of the United States Naval Academy in 1933,  assumed command of the Sumner on June 12, 1948 while the ship was in San Diego, California and was relieved May 26, 1949 in Norfolk, Virginia by Captain JOHNSON. His assignments prior to the Sumner included the USS New Mexico (BB-40) and the USS Raleigh (CL-9). Commander MAYBERRY's next assignment was at Stanford University, Palo Alto, California. In 1957 he served as Commanding Officer of the USS Chilton (APA-38) and in 1959 was COMPHIBRON TWO and COMTASKFOR 61. Thanks to Arne Schumacher for this picture of Captain MAYBERRY.

The following is his biography from the U.S. Naval Academy's 1933 Lucky Bag:

            DALE MAYBERRY Wichita, Kansas THE portrait printed above is the facial likeness of Dale Mayberry of Wichita, Kansas. Now Wichita is far famed because it is not far from the Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary, but you are assured that the above mentioned has nothing to do with the subject. His physiognomy is the only geographically perfect map-of-Kansas in existence. "Why, Kansas produced more wheat, oil, gas, eggs, and sunshine than any three states in the Union last year." A natural born politician, he had little trouble getting himself into one of the easier jobs with the Business Gang. He's a perfect roommate, always disagreeing with anything, either for the sake of argument, or just to be ornery. His one great fault is a constant desire and a phenomenal ability to sleep any time, any place, and in any position. His only academic worry is the language of the Dons and Senors which he strives mightily to conquer. Aside from that, he has the "ac" department eating out of his hand . There have been spicy rumors about his friends, the ladies, but we've never been able to prove anything. He receives numerous letters in feminine handwriting; but that's only circumstantial evidence. Wherever he goes, we'll be pulling for him.

1949-1951

 

Dwight Lyman Johnson, CDR, USN

Commander Dwight Lyman JOHNSON, a graduate of the United States Naval Academy in 1937, was born in Tulsa, Oklahoma August 16, 1914. He served in the Navy from June 1933 until his retirement as a Rear Admiral in June 1958. Commander JOHNSON assumed command of the Sumner on May 26, 1949 in Norfolk Virginia and was relieved by Captain GARTH July 17, 1951 in Norfolk, Virginia. Thanks to Bill Gonyo for this picture of Captain JOHNSON as a Midshipman.

The following is his biography from the U.S. Naval Academy's 1937 Lucky Bag:

            DWIGHT LYMAN JOHNSON Tulsa, Oklahoma. "Johnny" "D. L." THIS concentrating fellow, who must be allowed to complete his train of thought without interruption, is self- assured, hut not offensively so. In spite of an avowed passion for medicine and an admiration for hypnotism, he is a neat sailor. His strong likes and dislikes do not keep him from being a welcome hand at any bull session, which he usually turns into something resembling a side-show or an insane asylum. If you want the dope on anything from love to a half-nelson, Dwight is a veritable mentor, even going so far as to throw in a practical demonstration.

1951-1952

 

Craig Ransom Garth, CDR, USN

Commander GARTH, a graduate of the United States Naval Academy in 1934, was born July 8, 1909 and died in Saint Josephs, Missouri in March 1985. His assignments prior to the Sumner included the USS Pennsylvania (BB-38), USS Nashville (CL-43) and USS San Francisco (CA-38). Commander GARTH assumed command of the Sumner July 17, 1951 while the ship was in Norfolk, Virginia. He was relieved by Captain LYNCH August 8, 1952 while the Sumner was in drydock in Boston, Massachusetts. Thanks to Harlan Bloomquist for this picture of Captain GARTH.

The following is his biography from the U.S. Naval Academy's 1934 Lucky Bag:

            CRAIG RANSOM GARTH "Rico" "BW "Red" St. Joseph, Mo. BASHFUL and dignified. Bud came to the Academy from Missouri some five years ago. It is certain that St. Joseph ' s loss was our gain for Bud has over and over again proven his worth. His academics, with the exception of English, were rather trying. He was far from being bright in his studies, but, had he applied himself, he would have had no trouble with the work. His great failing was that he would not complete the five year course in four years. Rico has enjoyed the fair sex during his entire career. He was well-known at Carvel Hall, holding the all-time, all-Navy record of not missing a liberty in five years. His activities, however, did not end here, for he was also quite an athlete. In the fall he was a star on the company basketball team, in the winter he shot on the company pistol team, and in the spring he was a prominent company baseball player. When questioned on this procedure, he maintained with set lips that the company was in dire need of his services. Suave, happy, and popular, Bud emerges from the Academy. We cannot help but feel that he is well fitted to finish anything he undertakes. He will always be remembered by us for his fascinating manner and his desire to live life to the fullest. We wish him the best of luck in his chosen field, no matter what life he may choose.

1952-1953

Frank Curtis Lynch, Jr., CDR (SS), USN

Commander Frank Curtis LYNCH, Jr., a graduate of the United States Naval Academy in 1938, was born October 27, 1914 in Benedict, Kansas and served in the Navy from June 1938 to July 1954 and retired as a Captain. As a submariner he served aboard the USS Harder (SS-257) and USS Haddo (SS-255).  Among his many decorations are the Navy Cross with 2 stars, the Silver Star, Legion of Merit and the Bronze Star. He served as Commanding Officer of the Sumner during her retraining period and for the first part of the World Cruise to Korea. Captain LYNCH assumed command of the Sumner August 8, 1952 while the ship was in drydock in Boston, Massachusetts. When the Sumner was in Colombo, Ceylon (now Sri Lanka) on May 25, 1953 he was seriously injured in an automobile accident and was transferred to the USS Lake Champlain and placed on the critical list. LT A. R. OLSEN, Jr the Executive Officer assumed command until June 11, 1953 when he was relieved by Captain O'ROURKE while the ship was in Yokosuka, Japan.

The following is his biography from the U.S. Naval Academy's 1938 Lucky Bag:

            FRANK CURTIS LYNCH, JR. Kansas City, Missouri "tiny". FINE things are better appreciated than described. To draw a picture of a young fellow, however, blessed with a grand physique, immense vitality, and plenty of poise, coupled with a keenly analytical and well-developed mental organ, would be to outline substantially this character, Frank. He is of the fortunates with whom the briefest acquaintance is a pleasurable memory; the longest friendship, an unforgettable chapter. Native to Kansas, Frank is not conspicuously a Kansan. On the gridiron or the basketball court he handles his opponents as deftly as a teacup, and he twirls a wicked teacup! Track completes his year-round tour of the sports, for he excels in that, too. For a frolic or a fray, the lad is a best bet.

The following is the Citation for his Silver Star:

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Commander [then Lieutenant] Frank Curtis Lynch (NSN: 0-81040), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Diving Officer of a United States Submarine during a War Patrol ion enemy-controlled waters of the Pacific Ocean. Skilled and precise in the control of depth, Commander Lynch assisted his Commanding Officer in sinking four hostile ships totaling approximately 25,000 tons, in severely damaging an armed enemy trawler and in the successful evasion of Japanese countermeasures. His cool courage and judgment reflect the highest credit upon Commander Lynch and the United States Naval Service.

The following is the Citation for his first Navy Cross for the period 26 May 1944 to 21 June 1944:

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Commander [then Lieutenant Commander] Frank Curtis Lynch, United States Navy, for extraordinary heroism in the line of his profession as Executive Officer of the U.S.S. HARDER (SS-257), on the FIFTH War Patrol of that submarine during the period 26 May 1944 to 21 June 1944, in enemy controlled waters of the Southwest Pacific. Aggressive and determined in furnishing accurate approach information to his Commanding Officer throughout the entire patrol, Commander Lynch assisted in a series of brilliant, short-range attacks against hostile combat ships which resulted in the sinking of five first-line destroyers during a period of five days, and contributed to the successful evasion of strong enemy air and surface countermeasures. By his valiant courage and indomitable fighting spirit, Commander Lynch served as an inspiration to his fellow officers and crew and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

The following is the Citation for his second Navy Cross for the period 28 October 1944 to 27 December 1944:

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Navy Cross to Commander [then Lieutenant Commander} Frank Curtis Lynch (NSN: 0-81040), United States Navy, for extraordinary heroism in the line of his profession as Commanding Officer of the U.S.S. HADDO (SS-255), on the EIGHTH War Patrol of that submarine during the period 28 October 1944 to 27 December 1944, in enemy controlled waters of the Pacific War Area. Skilled and tireless in the performance of duty, Commander Lynch courageously penetrated strong enemy air and surface escort screens to launch smashing torpedo attacks and sink four enemy shops, including an unknown combatant vessel, totaling 11,000 tons. Expertly evading damage from severe depth charging and intense enemy aerial attack, he brought his ship safe to port. His leadership, courage and devotion to the completion of each perilous mission reflect the highest credit upon Commander Lynch, his command and the United States Naval Service.

The following is the Citation for his third Navy Cross for the period 31 May 1945 to 16 July 1945:

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Second Gold Star in lieu of a Third Award of the Navy Cross to Commander [then Lieutenant Commander] Frank Curtis Lynch, United States Navy, for extraordinary heroism in the line of his profession as Commanding Officer of the U.S.S. HADDO (SS-255), on the NINTH War Patrol of that submarine during the period 31 May 1945 to 16 July 1945, in enemy controlled waters of the East China Sea and Yellow Sea Areas. Boldly penetrating the enemy's inner defenses in a search for vital shipping, Commander Lynch delivered a withering torpedo attack against an enemy convoy with seven of the eight torpedoes fired finding their targets to sink four hostile freighters. Although unable to submerge in the extremely shallow waters when a Japanese patrol frigate came steaming out of a fog bank at a range of 800 yards with all guns blazing, Commander Lynch ordered "Emergency Full speed Ahead," effecting a brilliant escape in the face of a 700-ton patrol frigate and two small craft for a total of 18,000 tons of enemy shipping. His inspiring leadership, courage and devotion to duty under enemy fire reflect the highest credit upon Commander Lynch and the United States Naval Service.

1953-1955

Stephen Charles O'Rourke, CDR, USN

Commander Stephen Charles O'ROURKE, became Commanding Officer of the Sumner when it arrived in Japan. He graduated from the Naval Academy in 1939 and has served on board the QUINCY, SCHENCK, SOUTH DAKOTA, DONALD W. WOLF, MARSH, GREENWOOD and KEARSARGE. On the WOLF, MARSH and GREENWOOD he was Commanding Officer. He has also served at the Naval Academy Prep School at Bainbridge, Maryland; and as Ordnance Officer at the Charleston Naval Shipyard, Charleston, SC.   Commander O'ROURKE reported to the NROTCU at the University of California upon being relieved  March 22, 1955. Captain O'ROURKE assumed command from LT A. R. Olsen, Jr in Yokosuka, Japan on June 11, 1953 and was relieved by Captain HAISTEN March 22, 1955 while the ship was in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

The following is his biography from the U.S. Naval Academy's 1939 Lucky Bag:

            STEPHEN CHARLES O'ROURKE Bronx, New York City "Steve" "Pat". A SON of old New York, Steve let his carefree college days behind him to come down to the hanks of the Severn to learn the how, why, and wherefore of the Navy, and many times has lamented that "college was never like this." Many afternoons have found him toiling away in the gym at his customary daily workout, but the number of days he has spent in the natatorium he usually keeps a secret. He never misses his after-chow smoke to the accompaniment of music from the radio. He likes swing music and dancing, but he seldom drags. His hobby is clothes, though he of course doesn't have a very good chance to follow his fancies in the sartorial department except while on leave.

1955-1956

Homer Howard Haisten, Jr, CDR, USN

Commander Homer Howard HAISTEN, Jr., a graduate of the United States Naval Academy in 1943, was born in Tuscaloosa, Alabama on March 30, 1921. He served in the United States Navy from June 1939 until June 1972. He retired as a Captain. The picture was taken in Norfolk in 1978. Captain HAISTEN passed way October 21, 1993. Lieutenant Commander HAISTEN assumed command of the Sumner March 22, 1955 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania being promoted to Commander on April 9, 1955 and was relieved by Captain BEERS November 5, 1956 while the ship was at sea in the Mediterranean.

The following is his biography from the U.S. Naval Academy's 1943 Lucky Bag:

            HOMER HOWARD HAISTEN, JR. Birmingham, Alabama. Coming from Birmingham, Homer has all the traits of a true Southerner. He spent his "prep" years at Marion Institute learning to be a good soldier and then chose the Navy for a career. While waiting for his appointment to the Naval Academy, he went to Birmingham Southern to acquire that college touch which helped him keep his class standing in two figures. Rather than wear himself out with organized athletics. Homer preferred to spend his time skating in Smoke Park and sailing in yacht races. His winning smile will always insure him good company whether it be with young ladies or fellow officers.

1956-1958

Charles Joseph Beers, CDR (SS), USN

Commander Charles Joseph BEERS was born in Detroit, Michigan and attended the U. S. Naval Academy, graduating in 1940. He first served aboard the battleship USS PENNSYLVANIA and saw action at Pearl Harbor when the Japanese attacked. During World War II he was attached to the submarine SS-30 and USS Kraken (SS-370) and made a total of ten war patrols in the Aleutian Islands and in the Southwest Pacific. Upon the conclusion of World war II, Commander BEERS attended the U. S. Naval Postgraduate School at Annapolis, Maryland and R.P.I. at Troy, New York, where he graduated with an MS degree in Mechanical Engineering. In 1949 while attached to the staff, SUBRON SEVEN, he was one of the pioneers associated with the Submarine Guided Missile Program. During 1950-1951 Commander BEERS had command of the submarine USS REDFISH (SS-395) and spent six months in the Western Pacific during the Korean hostilities. During the period 1952-1955 he was on duty as the Bureau of Ordnance engaged in research and development of destroyer and submarine fire control systems. Prior to reporting aboard the SUMNER, Commander BEERS served as Operations Officer on the cruiser USS DES MOINES (CA-134). His assignment after leaving Sumner was to US Naval Ordnance Test Station, China Lake, Pasadena, California. He retired in July 1970 as a Captain. Captain Beers assumed command of the Sumner while she was at sea in the Mediterranean on November 5, 1956. He was relieved by Captain OLLER 15 April, 1958 while the ship was at anchor in Izmir, Turkey.  Captain Beers passed away at age 94.

1958-1959

  

John Secrist Oller, Jr, CDR, USN

Commander John Secrist OLLER, Jr. was commissioned in the Navy as an Ensign in 1942, and served in the Pacific area during World War II. He participated in the Solomons, Marianas and Philippines campaigns, and at the end of that war returned to the United States for post-graduate training in Aerological Engineering. CDR OLLER participated in the Navy Antarctic Cruise, Operation "Highjump" in 1946-1947, serving as task group aerological officer. He served in the same capacity in operations in the Arctic in 1947, and was later Aerological Officer of USS SAIPAN (CVL-49). During the Korean conflict CDR OLLER was aide and flag secretary to Commander Amphibious Group THREE, and participated in the amphibious assault at Inchon and in later assaults on the east coast of Korea. From 1952 to 1954 he was executive officer of USS ZELLARS (DD-777); and from 1954 to 1956, operations officer on the staff of Commander Training Command, U.S. Atlantic Fleet. He served for a short period as navigator of the veteran battleship MISSISSIPPI and from 1956 to January 1958 as the first executive officer of USS HERMITAGE (LSD-34). He has been awarded the Bronze Star Medal and Navy Commendation Medal, and wears the World War II Asiatic-Pacific campaign ribbon with six combat stars, and various other campaign ribbons. A native of Lancaster, Pennsylvania, CDR OLLER is a graduate of Franklin and Marshall College.  His next assignment was with The Bureau of Personnel in Washington. Captain Oller assumed command of the Sumner on April 15, 1958 while the ship was at anchor in Izmir, Turkey. He was relieved by Captain Porterfield October 16, 1959 while the ship was in Portsmouth, Virginia. CAPTAIN OLLER passed away on April 8 2005 in Falcons Landing, Virginia.

1959-1961

Floyd Robert Porterfield, CDR (SS), USN

Commander Floyd Robert PORTERFIELD was born in Quay, Oklahoma on November 13, 1917. He served in the United States Navy from January 1936 until December 1965. His serviced included the USS RED FISH (SS-395) and he completed war patrols aboard the USS Nautilus (SS-168) in World War II. Commander PORTERFIELD served a tour with the Surface Operations Strike Force Seventh Fleet. He holds the Navy & Marine Corps Commendation with 4 stars and the Presidential Unit Citation.  CDR Porterfield reported to Sumner from duty aboard the USS Muliphen (AKA-61). Captain PORTERFIELD assumed command October 16, 1959 in Portsmouth, Virginia and was relieved by Captain FLYNN July 18, 1961 while Sumner was in drydock in Charleston, South Carolina.

1961-1963

William Joseph Flynn, CDR, USN

Son of Dr. and Mrs. Charles T. Flynn of Branford, Connecticut, Commander William Joseph FLYNN was born in New Haven, Connecticut on February 4, 1923. He attended elementary school in Hamden and graduated from the Morgan School, Clinton, Connecticut in 1940. Following one year at Yale University, Commander FLYNN entered the U.S. Naval Academy at Annapolis, Maryland from which he graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree in 1944. He served his first duty on the USS WINSLOW (DD-359) on convoy patrol in the North Atlantic until the end of WW II then resumed normal destroyer operations including acceptance evaluation of the MK 56 gun fire control system as Gunnery Officer. In 1947 he reported to the USS CORAL SEA (CVA-43) as a member of the commissioning crew serving as First Division Officer and Aide to the Executive Officer through 1950. Commander FLYNN was then toured as an instructor of Engineering Drawing and Descriptive Geometry in the Department of Marine Engineering, U.S. Naval Academy from 1950-1952. Following this was a tour in command of LSM-397 in the Amphibious Force, U.S. Atlantic Fleet. In 1954 Commander Flynn reported as Senior Damage Control Inspector and Instructor Fleet Training Group, Chesapeake Bay. On detachment in May, 1956 he was assigned as Executive Officer USS ROBERT K. HUNTINGTON (DD-781) serving in that capacity until July, 1958 at which time he reported to the Engineering Department, U.S. Naval Academy as an instructor in Applied Thermodynamics. Detached in June 1961, Commander FLYNN reported shortly thereafter as Commanding Officer of the SUMNER while she was in the shipyard, in Charleston, S.C. undergoing her FRAM II conversion. Commander FLYNN is married to the former Charlotte M. Glynn of Portsmouth, Virginia. He was a dues paying member of our Association for a few years. Captain FLYNN assumed command on July 18, 1961 while the ship was in drydock in Charleston, South Carolina. He was relieved by Captain MILLER July 29, 1963 in Mayport, Florida.

The following is his biography from the U.S. Naval Academy's 1945 Lucky Bag:

            WILLIAM JOSEPH FLYNN Hamden, Connecticut "Flynner". The familiar character with the receding hairline, has spent plenty of time keeping the rest of us in stitches. His everlasting smile and red Irish face have become indispensable fixtures. Words can ' t express our regret in parting with Willy. His magnetic personality has attracted all. Everyone has bumped into him one place or another because when there was anything doing Flynn was either in the midst of it or the cause of it. Even the O. D. ' s followed his familiar call and the meek little plebes shuddered as he cracked his mighty whip. We are parting ways now, but we are all destined to meet the great little guy again.

1963-1964

Kirk Crothers Miller, Jr, CDR, USN

Commander Kirk Crothers MILLER, Jr., entered the U. S. Naval Academy in 1943 and graduated under the accelerated wartime program in 1945. The following four years were spent in USS HOUSTON (CL-81) and USS NANTAHALA (AO-60). Commander MILLER then returned to the Naval Academy as an instructor in Seamanship and Navigation before attending the Naval Postgraduate School in Communications. On graduation, he became Communications Officer for Commander Cruiser Division SIX. Captain MILLER assumed command of the Sumner July 29, 1963 in Mayport, Florida and was relieved by Captain BATY December 23, 1964 was in drydock in Charleston, South Carolina.

1964-1966

Edward McCoy Baty, CDR, USN

Commander Edward McCoy BATY was born in Des Moines, Iowa on September 26, 1928. Commander BATY commenced his Naval Service as a Midshipman, U.S. Naval Reserve Officers Training Corps, at Iowa State College, Ames, Iowa, in September 1946. He served in the USS ENDICOTT (DMS-35) after receiving his commission from July 1950 to October 1952, during which time the ENDICOTT was engaged in heavy shore bombardment and mine sweeping operations in Korean waters. While attached to USS ENDICOTT, Commander BATY was awarded the Commendation Ribbon with Combat Distinguishing Device for meritorious service as Gunnery and Main Battery Control Officer. Following this duty, Commander BATY served on the pre-commissioning detail of USS JOHN S. MCCAIN (DL-3) and served on board after commissioning as Fire Control Officer, until July 1, 1955. From August 1955 to July 1957 he was attending U.S. Naval Post-graduate School at Monterey, California as an Ordnance Engineering, Fire Control student. From Monterey Commander BATY went to Massachusetts Institute of Technology where he received his Master's degree. After graduation in May 1958, he reported aboard the USS NEWPORT NEWS (CA-148) where he served as AA Control Officer, Acting Gunnery Officer and spent the last year on board as Navigator. In July 1960, he was ordered to the Special Projects Office, Bureau of Naval weapons where he served in the Fire Control and Guidance Branch until July 1963, Commander BATY reported aboard the USS SAMPSON (DDG-10) to serve as Executive Officer until December 1964 when ordered to the USS ALLEN M. SUMNER (DD-692) as Commanding Officer. He retired in April 1980 as a Captain and passed away October 16, 1997. Captain BATY assumed command of the Sumner December 23, 1964 while the ship was in drydock in Charleston, South Carolina. He was relieved by Captain BEAMAN October 6, 1966 in Mayport, Florida.

1966-1968

Percy Stuart Beaman, CDR, USN

Commander Percy Stuart BEAMAN, born  March 26,1925 in Snow Hill, NC, attended North Carolina State College (1942-43) prior to entering the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy. Following graduation, February 23 1945, he sailed on several merchant tankers in various engineering capacities. At the end of World War II, Commander BEAMAN entered civilian life. He was called to active duty in 1951 to serve as Engineer Officer on the USS EDMONDS (DE-406). His next duty was on the Staff of COMCORTRON II. He then served on USS WHITEHURST (DE-634) as Executive Officer. During this assignment Commander BEAMAN was augmented into the regular Navy. Upon completion of this tour, he was assigned as Commanding Officer, USS STARK COUNTY (LST-1134). In June 1958 he entered the U.S. Naval War College as a student in the Command Staff Course. In August 1959 he was ordered to duty in the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations. In October Commander BEAMAN reported on board USS JONAS INGRAM (DD-938) as Executive Officer. On 8 August 1962 he assumed command of the USS BROUGH (DE-148), and in December 1963 reported to the Office of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. In January 1966 Commander BEAMAN proceeded to the United Kingdom Joint Services Staff College, remaining there until ordered to the SUMNER as Commanding Officer. Commander BEAMAN holds the Korean Service Medal, with three stars, a United Nations Service Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal and is authorized to wear the Korean Presidential Unit Citation awarded to the U.S. Seventh Fleet by the President for Service in Korean waters during the period November, 1951 to May, 1952. Commander BEAMAN is married to the former Lois PEEL of Benton Harbor, Michigan. Commander BEAMAN received the Bronze Star for his service in SUMNER's Vietnam deployment. In 1968 he was promoted to Captain and assumed command of the new USS Anchorage (LSD-36) and ultimately retired in June 1976. He died in Carson City, Nevada on May 3, 2002 from congestive heart failure and pneumonia. Captain BEAMAN assumed command on October 6, 1966 in Mayport, Florida and was relieved by Captain MEACHAM September 21, 1968 in Charleston, South Carolina.

1968-1970

 

 

James Alfred Meacham, CDR, USN

Commander James Alfred MEACHAM was commissioned an Ensign in the United States Navy on 2 February 1952. His first duty was as Mining Officer/First Lieutenant of the USS SHANNON (DM 25). A nine month course at the Advanced Mine Countermeasure School followed with susequent assignment as Staff Operations Officer, Mine Division Eighty. In October 1956, Commander MEACHAM served as Executive Officer of the commissioning crew of the USS ACME (MSO 508). Upon completion of his tour aboard the ACME, Commander MEACHAM was assigned to the Navy Post Graduate Intelligence School in preparation for his assignment as Assistant Naval Attache and Assistant Naval Attache for Air, Paris, France. In 1960 Commander MEACHAM returned to sea where he completed tours as Engineering Officer, USS MOALE (DD-693); Executive Officer, USS DYESS (DDR-880); and Commodore, Mine Division Forty Two. Duty as Mine Countermeasures Officer, COMINLANT followed. In 1966 Commander MEACHAM attended the School of Command and Staff, United States Naval War College, Newport, Rhode Island. Subsequently he was ordered to Saigon, Republic of Viet Nam, where he served on the staff of the Commander Military Assistance Command Viet Nam (MACV). Commander MEACHAM holds the Navy Expeditionary Medal, Naval Occupation Service Medal (European Theater), China Service Medal, National Defense Medal, Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal, Vietnam Service Medal and the Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal. His educational achievements include a B.S. degree from the University of Missouri and a Master of Science Degree in International Affairs from George Washington University. Captain MEACHAM assumed command of the Sumner September 21, 1968 in Charleston, South Carolina and was relieved by Captain LAIGHTON March 2, 1970 in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

1970-1971

Robert Haley Laighton, CDR, USN

Commander Robert Haley LAIGHTON was born in Portsmouth, New Hampshire on October 2, 1925. He graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in June 1951 and was commissioned Ensign, USN. His first tour of sea duty was as ASW Officer in USS PRESTON (DD-795) from June 1951 until May 1953. Next assignment was at NAS Pensacola and Corpus Christi as a Student Naval Aviator, completing basic CARQUAL landings and the All-Weather Flight School. From October 1953 until October 1955 he served as EMO/First Lieutenant/Gunnery Officer aboard the USS J. P. KENNEDY (DD-850). Commander LAIGHTON then reported as the Executive Officer of the USS SHELDRAKE (AGS-19) until October 1957, serving during the last four months as Commanding Officer. The next two years he was assigned as the Staff COMSTSLANTAREA - MSTSREP. In November 1959 he reported as Staff Operations Officer, COMDESRON FOUR. From March 1961 until August 1963 he was Assistant Plans Officer on the Staff, COMINLANT. From August 1963 until April 1964 he was Commanding Officer of USS ROGERS (DD-876) during FRAM I Overhaul and served as Executive Officer upon recommissioning until September 1965. His next assignment was as Executive Officer, MSTSO Saigon, Vietnam from December 1965 to December 1966. Commencing in January 1967 he was assigned to the Bureau of Naval Personnel, as Head Active Officer Promotions Branch, until ordered to SUMNER as Commanding Officer.  Commander LAIGHTON holds the Navy Commendation Medal, Navy Unit Commendation, World War II Victory Medal, National Defense Service Medal, Navy Occupation Medal (European Theater), Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal and the Republic of Vietnam Service Medal. He served in the United States Navy from August 1945 until September 1975. Captain LAIGHTON assumed command of the Sumner March 2, 1970 in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba and was relieved by Captain HOLLENBACH September 28, 1971 in Baltimore, Maryland.  He passed away on June 21, 2010 in Washington, DC.

The following is his biography from the U.S. Naval Academy's 1951 Lucky Bag:  

            ROBERT HALEY LAIGHTON Portsmouth, New Hampshire. New England born and bred ... it is only natural that Bob inherited a love of the sea and a desire for a naval career . . . his nickname "Doc" . . . its origin known but to a few . . . remains one of the mysteries of his personality . . . Bob's New England background instilled in him a love for the out-of-doors and sports, especially golf, baseball, football, and basketball . . . those yearly swimming tests seemed black magic, but that "If at first you don't succeed . . ." spirit pulled him through . . . Bob's interest are divided between Naval Aviation and the Line . . . which ever branch it is to be will gain an excellent officer.

1971-1973

  

Richard George Hollenbach, CDR, USN

Commander Richard George HOLLENBACH graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1954 and was commissioned an Ensign. His first tour of sea duty was as ASW and Gunnery Officer on the USS JAMES C. OWENS (DD-776) form July 1954 until December 1956. From December 1956 to March 1958, he served as Executive Officer and Navigator aboard the USS HUMMINGBIRD (MSC-192). His next assignment was with Staff, Commander Middle East Force as Aide and Flag Secretary during the period from April 1958 to April 1959. Commander HOLLENBACH then attended U.S. Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California for the following two years earning a B.S. Degree in Engineering Electronics. In August 1961, he assumed command of the USS QUAPAW (ATF-110) where he remained until June 1963. During his tour as Commanding Officer, QUAPAW won the Battle Efficiency "E" for fiscal year 1963. After this assignment, Commander HOLLENBACH became an instructor at the United States Naval Academy teaching Electrical Science. Following this assignment in July 1965, Commander HOLLENBACH was assigned as Operations Officer aboard the USS JOSEPHUS DANIELS (DLG-27) during which time the ship was the winner of the Operations "E" for fiscal year 1967 and winner of the Battle Efficiency "E" for fiscal years 1966 and 1968. His next duty was as Force Plans Officer for Staff, Commander Naval Forces Vietnam from June 1968 to June 1969. Commencing July 1969, Commander HOLLENBACH was assigned to Headquarters, Naval Ship Systems Command, as Head, Mine and NBC Countermeasures Branch in the Research Directorate. Commander HOLLENBACH assumed command of the SUMNER in September 1971. He holds the Legion of Merit, Navy Unit Commendation, National Defense Service Medal, Vietnam Service Medal, and Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal and ribbon with Device. Born in Windsor, Vermont but raised in Miami, Florida. Commander HOLLENBACH is married to the former Nancy Louise Spurr of Norfolk, Virginia. After being relieved on April 11, 1973 Commander Hollenbach assumed his new assignment as Commanding Officer USS CORRY (DD-817). Captain HOLLENBACH assumed command September 28, 1971 in Baltimore, Maryland and was relieved by Captain BRESNAHAN April 11, 1973 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

1973-1973

 

Maurice J. Bresnahan, Jr., LCDR, USN

Lieutenant Commander Maurice J. BRESNAHAN who was Sumners’ last Commanding Officer was born in Cambridge, MA September 17, 1939 and he served in the Navy from January 1959 until his retirement in June 1993 as a Rear Admiral. After Sumner, his duty stations included Special Assistant to the CNO, Military Sealift Command, Naval Surface Group 6 and command of the Naval Surface Reserve Force. His decorations include the Navy Commendation Medal twice, the Meritorious Service Medal, the Legion of Merit three times and the Navy Distinguished Service Medal. Admiral BRESNAHAN surprised the Association by showing up unannounced at our Memorial Service on board the USS Massachusetts at Fall River, MA, in 1994. Captain BRESNAHAN assumed command April 11, 1973 in Philadelphia and presided over the decommissioning August 15, 1973. Admiral BRESNAHAN passed away on November 6, 2004.


Executive Officer
"The XO"

1944-1944

David Lombard Harris, LCDR, USN

Lieutenant David Lombard HARRIS, a graduate of the United States Naval Academy in 1938, was Sumner's first Executive Officer assuming his position at Commissioning on January 26, 1944. He was promoted to Lieutenant Commander on April 26, 1944. Lieutenant Commander HARRIS was relieved by Lieutenant HINES in Pearl Harbor on October 1, 1944 and was transferred to ComDesPac the next day. He went on to serve as Captain aboard three more destroyers; USS Maury (DD-401), USS Charles J. Badger (DD-657) and USS Putnam (DD-757).

The following is his biography from the U.S. Naval Academy's 1938 Lucky Bag:

            DAVID LOMBARD HARRIS Pelham Manor, New York "Dave". DURING the first years of his life, Dave was attracted to the sea and has since remained loyal to it. With his sailboats he explored every inlet of Long Island Sound regardless of weather. Sailing season ended for him only when ice and sleet fouled the rigging. Acting in harmony with his calling, Dave entered the Academy. Here he renewed the lifelong feud of Harris vs. Dago. After three years Dave won by a decision. Mathematical subjects were "fruit," allowing him time to hone Yachting, business books, and yacht-designing. Typically one "of the boys," Dave was never fond of the regulation book. His good nature, common sense, and understanding make him a 4.0 roommate and companion. Being a man and a gentleman, Dave, you will be successful whatever your course. May all your sunsets be red.

1944-1945

Edward Corbett Hines, Jr., LCDR, USN

Lieutenant Commander Edward Corbett HINES, a graduate of the United States Naval Academy in 1941, was born in Wilmington, NC on July 16, 1917. He served in the United States Navy from June 1935 until September 1966. He relieved Lieutenant Commander HARRIS on October 1, 1944 in Pearl Harbor. He was relieved as XO by LT DRACHNIK on November 23, 1945. The picture was taken in Key West in 1942. He retired as a Commander.

The following is his biography from the U.S. Naval Academy's 1941 Lucky Bag:

            EDWARD CORBETT HINES, JR. equally at home in the social world. He can always be found at dances or parties while home on leave. Ned may not belong to the " savviest of the savvies, " but one thing is certain ; he will be striving constantly. On Graduation Day, he will look back upon a difficult task well done, and he can look forward to the second stage in the realization of an ambition held since his high school days ; to become a good naval officer.

1945-1947

Joseph Brennan Drachnik, LT, USN

Lieutenant Joseph Brennan DRACHNIK, a graduate of the United States Naval Academy in 1943, was born in San Rafael, California on June 11, 1919.  He served in the United States Navy from June 1942 until June 1972 retiring as a Captain.  The photograph was taken in Little Creek, Virginia in 1969.   Lieutenant DRACHNIK served as Chief Navy Section MAAG Vietnam, Internat Security Affairs, The Naval War College, Amphib Squadron 4 and Comphiblant besides his service aboard Sumner.  His awards included the Legion of Merit with Combat "V". Lieutenant DRACHNIK served aboard SUMNER from Commissioning until his transfer to the USS QUAPAW (ATF-110) and later served as Captain of the USS Benner (DD-807) from August 21 1959 to October 19 1961. He assumed duties as Sumner's XO on October 23, 1945 and left the Sumner April 22, 1947 in Pearl Harbor, T.H.  relieved by LT Richard H. JOHNSTON, Jr.

The following is his biography from the U.S. Naval Academy's 1943 Lucky Bag:

            JOSEPH BRENNAN DRACHNIK Berkeley, California. Joe, a native Californian, entered the academy after two years of university life. Plebe year found him taking an active interest in sports — cross country, track, and a bit of boxing. He was prevented from more active participation on the varsity track squad youngster year by a foray with the skinny department. On rainy days and weekends, he could be found answering his fan mail, relaxing to the strains of a swing hit, or indulging in a game of chess. Joe made many lasting friends during his course and is a sure bet to succeed in his chosen profession, the Navy.

1947-1948

  

Richard Howard Johnston, Jr., LT, USN

Lieutenant Richard Howard JOHNSTON, Jr., a graduate of the United States Naval Academy in 1943, assumed duties as the Executive Officer on April 28, 1947 in Pearl Harbor, T.H.  Lieutenant JOHNSTON was relieved by Lieutenant Commander RUSSELL in Long Beach, California on November 24, 1948. He passed away January 22, 2013.

The following is his biography from the U.S. Naval Academy's 1943 Lucky Bag:

            RICHARD HOWARD JOHNSTON, JR. Washington, D. C. Hailing from absolutely nowhere, and a Navy Junior to boot, "Howie" may definitely be classed as one of the incorrigibles. Not blessed with many savvy qualities, but never worrying too much, he managed to bulldoze his way through the academics. A running fool, but not entirely in vain, he received his "N" in Cross country and in track. His milder vices are singing in the choir, playing tennis, and dragging. That fighting heart developed putting out down the last few yards of the stretch will prove a valuable aid in the years to come. Ever carefree and living life to the fullest we are sure of his ultimate success.

1948-1950

 

 

Thomas E. Russell, LCDR, USN

Lieutenant Commander Thomas E. RUSSELL assumed duty as Executive Officer from Lieutenant JOHNSTON while the ship was in Long Beach, California on November 24, 1948. Lieutenant Commander RUSSELL was relieved by Lieutenant Commander Harry M. BRINSER in Norfolk, Virginia on April 15, 1950.

1950-1951

 

 

Harry Meylert Brinser, LCDR, USN

Lieutenant Commander Harry Meylert BRINSER, a graduate of the United States Naval Academy in 1942, relieved Lieutenant Commander Thomas E. Russell in Norfolk, Virginia on April 15, 1950.  Lieutenant Commander BRINSER was relieved as XO while the ship was in Norfolk on August 29, 1951 by Lieutenant Commander Richard W. HABERSAT. LCDR BRINSER left the Sumner on August 31, 1951 for duty at the Naval Gun Factory in Washington, D.C. Photo from the USNA 1942 Lucky Bag thanks to Bill Gonyo.

The following is his biography from the U.S. Naval Academy's 1942 Lucky Bag:

            HARRY MEYLERT BRINSER. Harry started off as a Navy Junior from California and finds life worth living, as he grunts his approval of the "system." His favorite pastimes are week-end ketch trips, plenty of swimming, and weekly magazines. To convince him requires nothing less than the Congressional Library, particularly if it concerns a femme. With his congenial personality and quiet determination, his career should be an enviable one.

1951-1953

 

 

Richard W. Habersat, LCDR, USN

Lieutenant Commander Richard W. HABERSAT became Sumner's Executive Officer upon relieving Lieutenant Commander Harry M. BRINSER in Norfolk on August 29, 1951. LCDR HABERSAT was relieved by Lieutenant Alfred Richard OLSEN, Jr. at Portsmouth, Virginia on February 12, 1953. After leaving the service Lieutenant Commander HABERSAT was employed for several years by Bausch & Lomb and others as Personnel Director until he was drawn back into the Navy in the Bureau of Personnel, as a civilian employee.  He was stationed in that capacity at Main Navy in Washington, and then at Crystal City, Virginia until he died of cancer in September, 1975.  His ashes are buried in the Veteran's Section, Royal Palms Memorial Gardens, West Palm Beach, Florida.

1953-1954

Alfred Richard Olsen, Jr., LT, USN

Lieutenant Alfred Richard OLSEN, Jr was born in Atlantic City, New Jersey on April 3, 1924.  He graduated in 1944 from the United States Naval Academy and served aboard the USS Biloxi and USS Providence.  Lieutenant OLSEN relieved LCDR HABERSAT in Portsmouth, Virginia on February 12, 1953. Following his Sumner service, first as Gun Boss and then XO, he was Commanding Officer of the USS Lester, USS John Paul Jones, USS Sierra and USS Biddle.  During Sumner's deployment to Korea Captain LYNCH was seriously injured in an automobile accident May 25, 1953 and LT Olsen took command sailing Sumner from Columbo, Ceylon until her arrival in Yokosuka, Japan when Captain O'Rourke reported aboard on June 11, 1953.  LT OLSEN retired as a Captain in 1974.  The photograph was taken in Washington, DC in 1970. Captain OLSEN is currently an active member of the Sumner Reunion Association. LT OLSEN was relieved by LCDR SCHOLL in Norfolk on March 26, 1954.

The following is his biography from the U.S. Naval Academy's 1945 Lucky Bag:

            ALFRED RICHARD OLSEN, JR. Atlantic City, New Jersey. "Ten thousand Swedes ran through the weeds pursued by one Norwegian." --- that was Al's favorite expression. His sharp wit and ready smile never dulled. "Olie," "the Swede" (much to his chagrin), "the Beaver," — he answered to them all. Sports were his great love, both writing and playing them. We'll remember him as the Grantland Rice of the LOG. There never was any closer follower of Navy teams. But, he also played — soccer and lacrosse being his favorites. Al ' s basso pro/undo emerging from the shower was like the roar of ocean waves, especially when he sang the praises of Atlantic City, " the World ' s Playground " — he said! Just keep that smile and song leading the way, Al, and the world will be yours!

1954-1956

 
 

Ray E. Scholl, LCDR, USN

Lieutenant Commander Ray E. Scholl assumed Executive Officer of the Sumner upon relieving LT OLSEN in Norfolk on March 26, 1954. He was relieved by Lieutenant Commander CARPENTER in Norfolk on June 2, 1956.

1956-1958

 

 

Albert Pinson Carpenter, LCDR, USN

Lieutenant Commander CARPENTER was a native of South Carolina, entered the Navy in 1938 as an NROTC student at the Georgia Institute of Technology, appointed as a Midshipman he entered the Naval Academy in June 1940, graduated in 1943 and received orders to the USS SIGSBEE (DD-502).  He served in numerous Pacific amphibious and carrier strike operations until the end of WWII.  He was then assigned to mine sweepers, USS CRUISE (AM-502) and USS REVENGE (AM-110).  This was followed by Naval Post Graduate School in 1947.  He was assigned to the USS WILLIAMSBURG (the President's Yacht, with additional duty as White House Aid and Naval Communications Officer to the President).  In 1950 he was assigned to the staff of CINC Atlantic Fleet as Aide and Flag Lieutenant to ADM W. M. Fechteler, he then returned to the Mine Forces as Commanding Officer of the USS SAGE (AM-111).  This was followed by orders to: the USS MISSISSIPPI; XO of USS Allen M SUMNER (DD-692); CO of the USS LOWRY (DD-770) 1961-1963; the USS DES MOINES CA-134, Flagship, US Sixth Fleet; CO of the USS ARLINGTON (AGMR-2) on June 17, 1968. Later he was assigned as Naval Attaché at Londonderry, Ireland. He retired as a Captain. Lieutenant Commander CARPENTER relieved Lieutenant Commander SCHOLL in Norfolk on June 2, 1956. He was relieved by LCDR WARFIELD in Norfolk on January 13, 1958.

1958-1958

John B. Warfield, LCDR, USN

Lieutenant Commander John B. WARFIELD enlisted in the Navy on 6 November 1939 at Baltimore, Maryland. He served as a Fire Controlman on Destroyers until his commission as an Ensign on 15 December 1944. He has served as Gunnery Officer on the USS BROWNSON (DD-868), USS HAYNSWORTH (DD-700) and as Assistant Gunnery Officer on the USS DES MOINES (CA-134). After attending George Washington University and General Line School in 1951, he took command of the USS LST 542. Prior to reporting to his present duty he was stationed at FADTC, Dam Neck, Virginia. LCDR WARFIELD has been awarded eight medals including the Good Conduct Medal, the American Defense Medal, and Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal with seven stars. He is a native of Howard County, Maryland.  Upon leaving Sumner LCDR WARFIELD reported to the USS Graham County (LST-1176). He relieved LCDR CARPENTER in Norfolk on January 13, 1958. He was relieved by Lieutenant Commander Joseph Maurice ELLIS on March 5, 1958 while the ship was enroute from Gibraltar to Golfe Juan, France.

1958-1960

 
 

Joseph Maurice Ellis, LCDR, USN

Lieutenant Commander Joseph Maurice Ellis reported to the Sumner on March 2, 1958 from the Fleet Sonar School in Key West, Florida.  He relieved Lieutenant Commander John B. WARFIELD on March 5, 1958 while the ship was enroute from Gibraltar to Golfe Juan, France and assumed duties as Executive Officer.

1960-1962

  

Robert Sumner Chaney, LCDR, USN

Lieutenant Commander Robert Sumner CHANEY was born December 17, 1925 in Southgate, California and passed away October 23, 1998.  He served in the United States Navy from July 1943 until his retirement in June 1965.  LCDR CHANEY designed the Sumner's logo that was in use from 1961 until her decommissioning in 1973. The photograph was taken in Naples, Italy in 1964 when he was serving with NATO, SOUTH EUROPE.

1962-1963

Charles Francis Nason, Jr, LCDR, USN

A graduate of Williams College, Lieutenant Commander NASON received his commission through Officer Candidate School, Newport, R.I. in May, 1953. Following two years aboard minesweepers in various engineering billets and finally as Executive Officer, he reported to the USS WISCONSIN (BB-64) where he served on the staff of Commander Battleship Division TWO. The USS DALY (DD-519) and the USS MACON (CA-132) were his next assignments. Upon completing a tour of shore duty as an instructor at the U.S. Naval School, Communications in Newport, R.I., LCDR NASON was ordered to the USS BIGELOW (DD-942) as Operations Officer in which capacity he served until reporting on board the SUMNER as Executive Officer in February 1962. Lieutenant Commander NASON was relieved by Lieutenant Commander WISEMAN and departed the Sumner on August 9, 1963 for duty at the Fleet Training Center in Charleston, SC while the ship was in Mayport.

1963-1965

 

Charles Henry Wiseman, LCDR, USN

Lieutenant Commander Charles Henry WISEMAN was born in New York, New York on July 11, 1928.  He served in the United States Navy from June 1948 until April 1973 and retired as a Commander.  He reported aboard the Sumner in Mayport on August 1, 1963 as relief for Lieutnenant Commander NASON. He was relieved by LCDR Flower in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba April 8, 1965.

1965-1966

John Richard Flower, LCDR, USN

Lieutenant Commander John Richard FLOWER commenced his Naval Service as a Midshipman, Merchant Marine Reserve, USNR, at the California Maritime Academy in Vallejo. Upon graduation, he was commissioned an Ensign, USNR. LCDR FLOWER was ordered in March 1957 to active duty in USS PAWCATUCK (AO-108) where he served as Engineering Officer. In March 1959 he returned to inactive duty. On 15 November 1960, LCDR Flower returned to active duty in USS NAVARRO (APA-215) as Engineering Officer. During this tour, NAVARRO. (as a unit of the Seventh Fleet Ready Amphibious Group), participated in the landing of Marines in Bangkok, Thailand in May 1962. He augmented to the regular navy in June 1962. While still deployed to WESTPAC he was ordered to the U.S. Naval Post Graduate School Monterey, California to attend the General Line Course. After postgraduate training, LCDR FLOWER attended the CIC school, Glynco, Georgia. He then reported to USS ROBERT L. WILSON (DD-847) where he served as Operations Officer from November 1963 until ordered to USS ALLEN M. SUMNER (DD-692) as Executive Officer in December 1964, and was advanced to Lieutenant Commander on 1 March 1965.  He relieved LCDR Wiseman in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba April 8, 1965 and was subsequently relieved by LCDR Moye in Mayport on May 18, 1966.

1966-1968

William Belmont Moye, Jr., LCDR, USN

Lieutenant Commander William Belmont MOYE, JR., was born February 18, 1928 in Orlando, Florida. He lived in Sanford, Florida until moving to Balboa, Canal Zone in 1941. He graduated from Balboa High School in June of 1945 and enlisted in the U.S. Navy in September of that year. During his enlisted service LCDR MOYE served aboard the USS LST 1078, USS KERMIT ROOSEVELT (ARG-16), USS SIERRA (AD-18) and USS ALBANY (CA-123), and attained the rate of Chief Electronics Technician. He attended Officer Candidate School in Newport, Rhode Island, graduating in March 1954. After being commissioned he was ordered to the USS HARVESON (DER-316) where he served as Electronics Material Officer, CIC Officer and Operations Officer. Then he received orders to the USS PASCAGOULA (PCE-874), first as Executive Officer and later as Commanding Officer. LCDR MOYE then attended the Navy General Line School in Monterey, California, served a tour in the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations in Washington, and returned to sea as Operations Officer of USS BARNEY (DDG-6). from there he was ordered to the U.S. Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, California, where he was awarded a Bachelor of Science degree in Mathematics in 1965 and a Master of Science degree in Mathematics in 1966. From there he reported aboard the USS ALLEN M. SUMNER (DD-692) as Executive Officer. For a three week period during combat operations off the coast of Vietnam, LCDR MOYE assumed command while CDR BEAMAN was hospitalized.  He received the Bronze Star for his service during the Vietnam deployment. LCDR MOYE was promoted to full Commander and transferred from SUMNER in 1968 for a three-year shore tour in the Weapons Systems Evaluation Group in the office of the Secretary of Defense. From there he was assigned as Commanding Officer, USS MEREDITH (DD-890), homeported in Mayport. Commander MOYE retired in February 1973 and spent the next 20 years pursuing a career in computer systems. He held successive jobs with the City of Jacksonville, Planning Research Corporation and Memorial Medical Center of Jacksonville retiring permanently in February 1993. He passed away on October 20, 2008. His son, William C. Moye, was Captain of the USS Comte de Grasse (DD-974) from 1993 to 1994 and is a retired Captain. CDR Moye relieved LCDR Flower in Mayport in May 18, 1966 and was subsequently relieved by LCDR Wyman on June 26, 1968 while the ship was in overhaul in Charleston, SC.

1968-1969

 

 

Harry Nichols Wyman III, LCDR, USN

Lieutenant Commander Harry Nichols Wyman III assumed duty as Executive Officer upon relieving CDR Moye on June 26, 1968 while the Sumner was at the Charleston, South Carolina Naval Shipyard.

1969-1971

Craig Andrew Preston, LCDR, USN

Lieutenant Commander Craig Andrew PRESTON was commissioned an Ensign at OCS in Newport, RI October 1957. He was then assigned to the Naval Air Training Command as a student pilot. This was followed by sea duty including service on the USS CHARA (AKA-58), USS NORTON SOUND (AVM-1) and USS MARIAS (AO-57). Next came The Naval Destroyer School followed by tours aboard the USS EDSON (DD-946) and USS WALLER (DD-466) along with a billet at COMNAVPHIL/CINCPACREPHIL in Plans.  In August 1969 Lieutenant Commander PRESTON reported to the USS Allen M. SUMNER (DD-692) as Executive Officer. Promoted to Commander upon leaving the SUMNER he worked various offices within OPNAV and MSCLANT.  Lieutenant Commander Preston's last sea duty was as Commanding Officer of the USS MOUNT BAKER (AE-34), retiring as a Captain in 1979.  He holds many awards including the Meritorious Service Medal, Joint Service Commendation Medal and the Navy Achievement Medal. Captain Preston is married to the former Barbara Fredericka Thelin and they have three children and six grandchildren.  Their son, LT C. Andrew Preston is the Navigator aboard the USS LOUISIANA (SSBN 743 Gold) sailing out of Kings Bay, GA.

1971-1972

Robert Earle Fleming, LCDR, USN

Lieutenant Commander Robert Earle FLEMING was born in Detroit, Michigan on October 9, 1935. He served in the United States Navy from March 1958 until February 1981. He retired as a Commander. The picture was taken in Rota, Spain in 1975.  Upon leaving the SUMNER he reported to Human Relations Development Branch, Newport, R.I.

1972-1973

  

Maurice J. Bresnahan, Jr., LCDR, USN

Lieutenant Commander Maurice J. BRESNAHAN who was also Sumners’ last Commanding Officer was born in Cambridge, MA September 17, 1939 and he served in the Navy from January 1959 until his retirement in June 1993 as a Rear Admiral. After Sumner, his duty stations included Special Assistant to the CNO, Military Sealift Command, Naval Surface Group 6 and command of the Naval Surface Reserve Force. His decorations include the Navy Commendation Medal twice, the Meritorious Service Medal, the Legion of Merit three times and the Navy Distinguished Service Medal. Admiral BRESNAHAN surprised the Association by showing up unannounced at our Memorial Service on board the USS Massachusetts at Fall River, MA, in 1994. Admiral Bresnahan passed away on November 6, 2004.

1973-1973

 

 

William R. Gongaware, LT, USN

Lieutenant William R. Gongaware was born October 30, 1940 in Ft. Wayne, Indiana. He was Sumner's last Executive Officer replacing LCDR Bresnahan on April 11, 1973. LT Gongaware retired from the Navy as a LCDR after 22 years of service. Subsequent to the Navy he spent 9 years as Director of Technical Support for the Fossil and Hydro Division of Virginia Power and then 16 years as a professor at J. Sergeant Reynolds Community College in Richmond, Virginia. He passed away on August 1, 2004 in Richmond and was buried with Military Honors in Peninsula Memorial Park.

Note: References to the Lucky Bag refer to the Year Books of the U.S. Naval Academy

Can you help us fill in the gaps with biographical data and/or pictures of Our Captain's and XO's???
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